GRIFFIN ARTIST BLOG

Griffin Artist Card membership is an initiative to increase access to our theatre. This program facilitates the coming together of artists across different disciplines and at different stages of their career. It supports and strengthens a vibrant emerging artist community, as well as acknowledging this community as an important part of the Griffin family and the wider theatre world.

How does it work? We want to offer a place where artists can see work, discuss work and make work.

To see work, we will continue to offer heavily discounted $15 tickets, which can be booked in the first fortnight of all Griffin and Griffin Independent shows, Performance Space shows at members' rates and ticket deals and giveaways to other theatre companies.

To discuss work, we are introducing regular Artist Card events where the community can come together for a drink.

And finally, we are supporting emerging artists in their making of new, bold and exciting work. Griffringe will continue to be a great avenue for artist card holders to display their work. We will also be offering (where possible!) free use of our space for readings and developments.

The Artist Card is a community. It is the glitter glue that brings all the cool amazing arty people together and helps them sparkle. So it's almost like glitter glue squared. If you are interested in joining the artist card outfit, please email artist@griffintheatre.com.au or come along to our next shindig….Hope to see you there!

Posts tagged Kevin Jackson

Aug 22

Should you make a play just ‘cos?

This is the question, although phrased far more eloquently, that Kevin Jackson poses in his review of Simon Stone’sFace to Face, which has just opened at STC.

"Now, if I was having a dinner party, (wherever), and had Mr Stone, Upton and Bergman as guests, who would I want to talk about FACE TO FACE with, do you think? Whose problem solving would be of most interest?

Which one is regarded as a genius?

For, as far as problem solving goes, based around the Bergman screenplay, by Mr Stone and Upton:

  • When did you last see a show with only furniture in a black box, wheeled on and off by stage crew? 
  • When did you last see a white box, lit with blaring blue/white forensic colour? (Set and Lighting Design by Nick Schlieper).
  • When did you last see a glass wall between you and the actors, requiring them to be microphoned?
  • When did you last see said box, fly up into the ‘heavens’, and hover just above the actors?
  • When did you last see a set of mono-chromatic costumes looking like our own clothes? (Costume Design by Alice Babidge).
  • When did you last see a good film actress attempt to play a leading role in the theatre, and not quite get there? (The film, by the way, starred Liv Ullmann, and she was nominated for the Academy Award and BAFTA Award for Best Actress, 1976).
  • When did you last see some actors more often used as set or furniture movers in a performance than actually acting?
  • Is the choice of this Sydney Theatre scale the wise choice for this work? The intimacy of the journey content and the possibilities of the acting could be better achieved in say, Wharf 1, better, Yes? Or, No? Or, was it just for the possibilities of the design pyrotechnics, that guided the choice of venue?
  • Now, do any of you remember either of the STC’s production of Alan Ayckbourn’s A WOMAN IN MIND (two of them, indeed), or, THE WONDERFUL WORLD OF DISSOCIA by Anthony Neilson (other plays concerning the mental breakdown of a member of the female sex)? Familiar territory, yes? The Neilson play, especially interesting and contemporary.
  • So, when were you last bored in the theatre, with a grave sense of deja vu? A deja vu of content and production design techniques?
  • I wonder, do you think this production might be registering an artistic fatigue on the part of Mr Stone? FACE TO FACE is the fourth major production of his we have seen this year: THYESTES, STRANGE INTERLUDE, DEATH OF A SALESMAN. An olympian output, indeed. Exhausting.

(…)

(H)ire or purchase the Ingmar Bergman film (I bought it at TITLE on Crown St for $35.00). When I got home from the performance at the Sydney Theatre, I watched the film. There had to be more to this famous screenplay than what we saw in 90 odd minutes of playwriting adaptation, surely? There just had to be. The film is some 136 minutes long. And this is adapted from a 4 hour television production !

There was something more. Wonderfully more. In the real sense of, wonder = to marvel at; to be excited by what is a strange and surprising viewpoint; to a feeling of surprised or puzzled interest, tinged with a wide-eyed admiration.

The film is a genuine expression of a genius concerned with the observation of the loneliness of mankind and the bravery of man, in the figure of Jenny, a psychiatrist, in the midst of a breakdown, that brings her face to face with herself, and with her intellectual/emotional wrestling with the contemplation of the big issues of love and death, in the midst of trying to live through her life choices, resulting in the final realisation, that “love surrounds everything, even death”. It is harrowing but majesterial in its ability to move one.

This adaptation of the Bergman screenplay by Simon Stone and Andrew Upton diminishes the ambitions and successes of the Bergman creativity. There is much excising of character and situations and observations. Where Mr Stone and Upton seemed to be occupied with design wonders and theatrics, of a black and white kind, Mr Bergman focused on complex storytelling and intimacies. The saga of Jenny was reflected through parallel stories of other characters’ stories - the film has a density of experience in its telling. Every design and theatrical gesture, in the film, were integral to the development of Jenny’s and her extended world’s story, not a demonstration of directorial cleverness. Content and theme relevancies in the film, were of resonant universal vibrations and observances, incorporating an almost religious breadth of vision. The Bergman original, in the Mr Upton & Stone, is reduced to the relative banalities of a virtual linear narrative of breakdown and dream, without any great dimensional power or sense of awe. Essentially, in my experience, simply linear. Almost, a “reductio ad absurdum”. The direct comparison of the hospital dream sequence in the film and here on the Sydney Theatre stage, for example, reveals the contrasting imaginations and theatrics of the writers and directors of these two different FACE TO FACE experiences. The Bergman integrities are richer, deeper, demandingly confronting, and ultimately humbling, in a virtuosic way. One embraces the condition of being human in the face of the world we exist in, face to face. One is not bored with simplistic representations and surface acting, that, comparatively, I experienced, in the theatre.

Compare and contrast for yourself.

Why would I not choose to see Bergman’s solutions over those of Mr Stone and Upton? I have. I have watched the film twice this week, so blown away by the greatness of the film, and the performances, was I. If you can still choose, I do not believe there is any life gain in attending to the Sydney Theatre Company production. Indeed, Simon Stone and Andrew Upton, these two “theatre-tinkerers” have created a grim piece of hackery that does not add to, or, even tell anywhere near the profundity of the Bergman. Bergman has done, as Cate and Andrew have predicted, in their Artistic Director’s notes, “a terrific job”. And, for certain, the two contemporary artists, here in Sydney, were not influenced by any of the choices of the genius, writer-directer, Ingmar Bergman. They had not the same imaginative scope, it seems. More’s the pity, I reckon.

Why do it then? Because, they can, I guess.

 So why see it, then, at the theatre, when the film is so much better in every way, and is available, in your own living room?  You can, you know.”

Interesting, KJ. Very interesting.


Aug 21
Blood Pressure
Michael is late. Adam keeps vomiting. Two men face off in a hotel room. They mark each other with new scars, while tearing apart the old. Blood is shed. This claustrophobic new play looks at the intimacy of kinship, the fragility of the body, and the phantom limbs of family.
Bodysnatchers present Blood Pressure a razor-sharp play about family, guilt and choice.
Click HERE to buy tickets
"The Tamarama Rock Surfers Theatre Company, back on track. Independent Theatre showing the way, again." Read the rest of KJ’s review here.
Keep an eye out for Bodysnatchers’ profile on the blog in the coming weeks.

Blood Pressure

Michael is late. Adam keeps vomiting. Two men face off in a hotel room. They mark each other with new scars, while tearing apart the old. Blood is shed. This claustrophobic new play looks at the intimacy of kinship, the fragility of the body, and the phantom limbs of family.

Bodysnatchers present Blood Pressure a razor-sharp play about family, guilt and choice.

Click HERE to buy tickets

"The Tamarama Rock Surfers Theatre Company, back on track. Independent Theatre showing the way, again." Read the rest of KJ’s review here.

Keep an eye out for Bodysnatchers’ profile on the blog in the coming weeks.


Jun 12

HOLD ONTO YOUR PANTS!

OK guys, this is it. It’s here. The Griffringe to end all Griffringes. Have we got a night for you.

Here’s how it’s going to go:

Thursday, June 14th.

2pm: Griffin is hosting a forum on Practical Matters for Artists where we get to ask industry specialists those things we have no idea about. Ie. is it legit to claim caffeine by-products as a work expense? OR how will I have super if I am a self-funded artiste?

5pm (or thereabouts): We hang out in the Griffin foyer because there are going to be BUCKETS of Bourke St Bakery delights around the place. Also, there will be musicians to serenade you, including the majestic Laurence Rosier Staines, of super FLORENCE jam, strumming solo.

7pm: Griffringe

(including the talents of Katie Pollock, Kevin Jackson, Caroline Craig, Yve Blake, Roslyn Helper, Nicholas Jordan, Patrick Lenton, Ngaire O’Leary, Alli Sebastian Wolf, Scarlet McGlynn, Benito Di Fonzo, Alex Williams, Stephen Jones, and Lincoln Hall.)

8.30pm: We head over to the Kings Cross Hotel, Griffin puts a tab on the bar, and we all get to have a fine old night.

Rad, right?


Jun 6

Festival Special Griffringer #1: Katie Pollock

That’s right. The Griffringe Festival Special line-up has been set in stone and you are going to be meeting the artists here, one by one, and hearing a little bit about their work.

First up is Katie Pollock, talking about her monologue:

Contact

Written by Katie Pollock

Directed by Kevin Jackson

Performed by Caroline Craig

I’m really buzzed that Kevin and Caroline are working with me on my monologue Contact for Griffringe because I love working with super-talented people.

Caroline and I are working together on a longer show about women who fall in love with prisoners (The Blue Angel Hotel, going on at The Old Fitz in November) and this monologue was written as a little side project to that one.

The perspective of Blue Angel is very much from the inside of a world that’s quite alien to me while the news event that inspired Contact shows another facet of that world – from the perspective of the law enforcers – also outside of my own experience. It occurred to me that the people involved in that incident and others like it would all have their own private worlds that are alien to others and it’s the place these worlds clash or crossover that I’m interested in exploring. I wanted to look at a detail of life in our city and try to reframe it, view it from a different angle – culturally, socially or politically.

I’m interested in putting elements that don’t normally go together in the same Petri dish, sticking them under the microscope and seeing what happens. Those elements could be theme, character, language or form, or all of them – whatever makes a nice spark when you bash them together!

Remember to buy your tickets soon as this one will sell out quickly with all the amazing music, theatre, food, friends, and alcohol lined up. Who said Thursday night wasn’t a party night?


May 27

ATTENTION PLAYWRIGHTS: A LESSON IN FRENCH KISSING

This isn’t really a lesson in French kissing. It’s about Kevin Jackson’s review of LES LIAISONS DANGEREUSES. But the play is set in France. And there’s a lot of kissing.

Long story short: KJ dug this production.

What is more interesting are his thoughts on the importance of this script as a lesson for playwrights on the craft of playwriting:

Observe, study, Mr Hampton’s meticulous use of language, the vocabulary. The syntactical control of the musicalities of the phrase and sentence, speech structures, that reveal the sub-textual opportunities of the characters devious developments - the possible thought process - the syntax spaces being one of the keys for the actors to investigate the character machinations, and to find the wicked, wicked comedy of the play. Add the finically careful, solicitous information written in the instructions for the actors to reveal, to facilitate, and you have an exemplary primary source for interpretative creativity. There is a superstructure of magnificent clarity in this writing, that the actors and director can have, with insistent ‘close reading’ , to assist them to unravel and to organise the plasticity of the moments, the live adrenalin impulses that happen in the instant of acting, for transparent, great story telling. The challenge to the actor is to do justice to this work template, and it is, deceptively,enormous. If there is evidence needed that the writer is the centre of the theatre experience, here it is.Take the writer’s blue print as your guide, and expand and rise to the possibilities. The challenge of all classic writing, in all its forms, of every period.

Read closely, (even out loud) note the syntax carefully:

MERTEUIL: That’s enough, Vicomte.

VALMONT: You’re absolutely right. Shall we go up?

MERTEUIL: Shall we what?

VALMONT:Go up. Unless you prefer, this, if my memory serves, rather purgatorial sofa.

MERTEUIL:I believe it’s time you were going.

(Silence.)

VALMONT: No. I don’t think so. We made an arrangement. I really don’t think I can allow myself to be taken advantage of a moment longer.

MERTEUIL: Remember I’m better at this than you are.

VALMONT: Perhaps. But it’s always the best swimmers who drown. Now. Yes or no? Up to you, of course. I wouldn’t dream of trying to influence you. I therefore confine myself to remarking that a no will be regarded as a declaration of war. So. One single word is all that is required.

MERTEUIL: All right.

(She looks at him evenly for a moment, almost long enough for him to conclude that she has made her answer. But she hasn’t. It follows now, calm and authoritative.)

War.

(Blackout.)
 Page 95, Faber and Faber, 1985 edition.

Read the rest of KJ’s stellar review here.


Apr 3
A QUICK PEEK AT LYREBIRD BY AMELIA EVANS
"Evans’s play addresses issues of displacement and homelessness, depression and survivor guilt, and the tensions arising between those who decide to stay and rebuild and those who feel unable to start again. It does so soberly but with flashes of dry humour and an eye for human foibles." Jason Blake seemed to be very impressed with the production, particularly with the performances. Read his SMH article here.
Despite an overlong exposition, Jessica Keath from artsHub declares it to be a ‘thoroughly contemporary, moving, and generous Australian tale.’ I was particularly impressed by Keath’s comment that Evans captures the Australian country vernacular with a total absence of cultural cringe. Read the review here.
KJ loved the script: “The play is, in form conventional in its structure, but, has an eloquence of truth and pain that is exquisite in its expression. In all of its observed accuracy there is a poetic sense of order with a gentle and sly eye for the small comic foibles of the familiar - of family and close friends, as a veneer for us, the audience, to release into, to be able to endure the almost unbearable.”
He was less sure of the production however. The trouble with being an ex-head of acting at one of the leading drama schools in the country is that you have an eye for the craft and some of the performers’ technique did not stand the KJ test.
He also said something very interesting, although I’m not sure that I agree with him:
"I remember someone saying once (was it Richard Wherrett?) - and I believe it to be true - that new plays really need the most experienced directors to give them as great an opportunity as possible to succeed. Give the young directors the classics to hone their skills – the tried and proven for them to exercise their talents and learn – the good writer will support them. The young writer will be supported and enhanced by the experienced director."
Surely much can be gained by young and emerging artists cutting their teeth on the same task?
He makes the point that the Old Fitz’s last two productions, The Importance of Being Ernest Dragons and now Lyrebird have both had the writing obscured by the ‘fledgling skills’ of the two directors. This may or may not be true but it does not speak of those moments when young directors and writers succeed together. This may be rare, but the opportunity for it to occur should never be removed for the sake of increasing the chances of success of one or the other.
KJ does not seem very impressed in general with the Old Fitz at the moment. Read his full article here.
The Old Fitzroy Theatre  Season Dates: 28March – 21st April 2012 Times: Tue-Sat 8pm, Sun 5pm  Opening Night: 30th March 2012 @ 8pm Tickets:$25 Conc, $33 Adult, Cheap Tuesdays & previews $21

A QUICK PEEK AT LYREBIRD BY AMELIA EVANS

"Evans’s play addresses issues of displacement and homelessness, depression and survivor guilt, and the tensions arising between those who decide to stay and rebuild and those who feel unable to start again. It does so soberly but with flashes of dry humour and an eye for human foibles." Jason Blake seemed to be very impressed with the production, particularly with the performances. Read his SMH article here.

Despite an overlong exposition, Jessica Keath from artsHub declares it to be a ‘thoroughly contemporary, moving, and generous Australian tale.’ I was particularly impressed by Keath’s comment that Evans captures the Australian country vernacular with a total absence of cultural cringe. Read the review here.

KJ loved the script: “The play is, in form conventional in its structure, but, has an eloquence of truth and pain that is exquisite in its expression. In all of its observed accuracy there is a poetic sense of order with a gentle and sly eye for the small comic foibles of the familiar - of family and close friends, as a veneer for us, the audience, to release into, to be able to endure the almost unbearable.”

He was less sure of the production however. The trouble with being an ex-head of acting at one of the leading drama schools in the country is that you have an eye for the craft and some of the performers’ technique did not stand the KJ test.

He also said something very interesting, although I’m not sure that I agree with him:

"I remember someone saying once (was it Richard Wherrett?) - and I believe it to be true - that new plays really need the most experienced directors to give them as great an opportunity as possible to succeed. Give the young directors the classics to hone their skills – the tried and proven for them to exercise their talents and learn – the good writer will support them. The young writer will be supported and enhanced by the experienced director."

Surely much can be gained by young and emerging artists cutting their teeth on the same task?

He makes the point that the Old Fitz’s last two productions, The Importance of Being Ernest Dragons and now Lyrebird have both had the writing obscured by the ‘fledgling skills’ of the two directors. This may or may not be true but it does not speak of those moments when young directors and writers succeed together. This may be rare, but the opportunity for it to occur should never be removed for the sake of increasing the chances of success of one or the other.

KJ does not seem very impressed in general with the Old Fitz at the moment. Read his full article here.

The Old Fitzroy Theatre
Season Dates: 28March – 21st April 2012
Times: Tue-Sat 8pm, Sun 5pm
Opening Night: 30th March 2012 @ 8pm
Tickets:$25 Conc, $33 Adult, Cheap Tuesdays & previews $21


Mar 9

Theatre Blogging - Response to Belvoir

Belvoir’s forum on Sunday was not as fiery as the audience would have been led to belive whilst milling around in the foyer beforehand. Jane Simmons was not shouted down for her ‘direct’ style, nor was there much debate over the role of theatre blogging in our current cultural landscape (which is what, I think, the forum had originally intended to be about).

Somehow, it ended up being a comparison between print and online criticism, and there was little shouting to boot (none at all, save Chris Taylor’s rant about Baal).

"Please join us for an extra special Sunday Forum dedicated to the current debate within the arts community around the art of cultural blogging. Who speaks for who now, and what’s the process? Has the theatrical landscape changed with the arrival of bloggers?"

None of these questions were explored in any depth.

Credit should be payed to Belvoir for scheduling a forum so topical to the current debates circulating around blogging but it seems to have missed the mark, particularly by failing to invite any established Sydney bloggers, such as Kevin Jackson, James Waites, or Augusta Supple (an omission noted by more than one audience member).

The time that was spent on theatre blogging hinged on Simmons’ newly-found notoriety rather than the implications of the zeitgeist that blogging has become (with Alison Croggon shaking her head quite vigorously whenever Simmons spoke, something that was quite intriguing but which Taylor failed to investigate). Even though Croggon is based in Melbourne, her blog, theatre notes, is well worth following, if only for the quality of her writing and the clearness of her criticism. Check her out here.


Mar 7
Kevin Jackson.
What a guy.
I was updating myself on his blog posts and I am came upon a grand throwing-down-the-gauntlet challenge to Australian theatre. Within his review ofBabyteeth(currently showing at Belvoir), which included a small side-note onPygmalion(STC), I found this:
"Having been recently inspired by the pleasure and wit and challenge of the writing of George Bernard Shaw’s PYGMALION, the sheer complexity (relative, of course) of the Act Five clash between Eliza and Henry, mesmerizing and cumulatively life enhancing, it seems I want more from our Australian writers than what I am getting. Do we as a culture not have it in us? The persistent voice of the Australian writer and, perhaps appetite of the Australian audience, (or the one our Artistic choosers of plays at the company’s we attend) seems to be content with, is the relative sentimental affirmation of having the world shown to us as it is without much further interrogation. A sense of making us relaxed and comfortable with what is transpiring around us, being moved by our feelings of grateful recognition but not necessarily thoughtfully challenged about the morality of it all. The simple decency of it all.
[…] These recent new Australian plays are good but mostly an anaesthesia. I would like something more. Maybe these writers are not that kind of writer and we should be grateful for what they can do. But there are others, surely? There are plays, being written, surely, that deal with  Australian culture, history and lifestyle with a seriously discriminating intelligence and offer of balanced controversial debate?”
Phwoar. I do not know whether this is a fair assessment of the current Australian theatrical landscape or not but I do know that there is definitely not enough gauntlet-throwing of this scale going on. Read his whole post here.
We are lucky enough to be having Kevin hosting an Open Class for the public on Sunday 18 March. This will be your chance to observe as he teaches a class of 10 professional actors and maybe gain an insight into the ‘mystery of the craft of acting’. For more info, check out the Griffin website here. Get on it.

Kevin Jackson.

What a guy.

I was updating myself on his blog posts and I am came upon a grand throwing-down-the-gauntlet challenge to Australian theatre. Within his review ofBabyteeth(currently showing at Belvoir), which included a small side-note onPygmalion(STC), I found this:

"Having been recently inspired by the pleasure and wit and challenge of the writing of George Bernard Shaw’s PYGMALION, the sheer complexity (relative, of course) of the Act Five clash between Eliza and Henry, mesmerizing and cumulatively life enhancing, it seems I want more from our Australian writers than what I am getting. Do we as a culture not have it in us?

The persistent voice of the Australian writer and, perhaps appetite of the Australian audience, (or the one our Artistic choosers of plays at the company’s we attend) seems to be content with, is the relative sentimental affirmation of having the world shown to us as it is without much further interrogation. A sense of making us relaxed and comfortable with what is transpiring around us, being moved by our feelings of grateful recognition but not necessarily thoughtfully challenged about the morality of it all. The simple decency of it all.

[…]
These recent new Australian plays are good but mostly an anaesthesia. I would like something more. Maybe these writers are not that kind of writer and we should be grateful for what they can do. But there are others, surely? There are plays, being written, surely, that deal with  Australian culture, history and lifestyle with a seriously discriminating intelligence and offer of balanced controversial debate?”

Phwoar. I do not know whether this is a fair assessment of the current Australian theatrical landscape or not but I do know that there is definitely not enough gauntlet-throwing of this scale going on. Read his whole post here.

We are lucky enough to be having Kevin hosting an Open Class for the public on Sunday 18 March. This will be your chance to observe as he teaches a class of 10 professional actors and maybe gain an insight into the ‘mystery of the craft of acting’. For more info, check out the Griffin website here. Get on it.


Feb 21
Playwriting Festival - NSW Writers Centre
Award-winning playwright and all round cool cat Kate Mulvany has  curated the first festival of the year for the NSW Writers Centre.
"The Playwriting Festival will bring together some of Australia’s  best  and brightest playwrights, dramaturgs, artistic directors and  reviewers  including Van Badham, Vanessa Bates, Jane Bodie, Fraser Corfield, Duncan Graham, Kevin Jackson, Andrea James, Leland Kean, Mark Kilmurry, John McCallum, Tony McNamara, Tommy Murphy, Debra Oswald, Lachlan Philpott, Polly Rowe, Diana Simmonds, Sam Strong, Augusta Supple.
Just confirmed to join the line up are Katherine Thomson (Diving For Pearls, King Tide) and Ian Meadows (Four Deaths in the Life of Ronaldo Abok).
The program will cover the craft and business of playwriting with   panels on the changing face of Australian playwriting; the pros and cons   of working with directors and dramaturgs; what mainstage theatre   companies are looking for; working in the fringe theatre scene; the   reviewed versus the reviewer; and the playwright’s role in the   production process. A full program will be released very soon.
There will be script sales, gourmet food and coffee, plenty of free   parking and you are welcome to join us on the veranda at the end of the   day for a complimentary post-festival drink. NSW Writers’ Centre  members  also receive a generous discount on festival bookings.”
Bookings can be made from 30 January. NSW Writers’ Centre Members $55 / Concession Members $45 / Non-members $80.
The Festival is being held on Saturday 3 March.
Kate has written a stunning summation of playwriting on the Centre’s website. Make sure you read it and also check out the full festival program.

Playwriting Festival - NSW Writers Centre

Award-winning playwright and all round cool cat Kate Mulvany has curated the first festival of the year for the NSW Writers Centre.

"The Playwriting Festival will bring together some of Australia’s best and brightest playwrights, dramaturgs, artistic directors and reviewers including Van Badham, Vanessa BatesJane Bodie, Fraser Corfield, Duncan Graham, Kevin Jackson, Andrea JamesLeland Kean, Mark Kilmurry, John McCallum, Tony McNamara, Tommy Murphy, Debra Oswald, Lachlan Philpott, Polly Rowe, Diana Simmonds, Sam Strong, Augusta Supple.

Just confirmed to join the line up are Katherine Thomson (Diving For Pearls, King Tide) and Ian Meadows (Four Deaths in the Life of Ronaldo Abok).

The program will cover the craft and business of playwriting with panels on the changing face of Australian playwriting; the pros and cons of working with directors and dramaturgs; what mainstage theatre companies are looking for; working in the fringe theatre scene; the reviewed versus the reviewer; and the playwright’s role in the production process. A full program will be released very soon.

There will be script sales, gourmet food and coffee, plenty of free parking and you are welcome to join us on the veranda at the end of the day for a complimentary post-festival drink. NSW Writers’ Centre members also receive a generous discount on festival bookings.”

Bookings can be made from 30 January. NSW Writers’ Centre Members $55 / Concession Members $45 / Non-members $80.

The Festival is being held on Saturday 3 March.

Kate has written a stunning summation of playwriting on the Centre’s website. Make sure you read it and also check out the full festival program.


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