GRIFFIN ARTIST BLOG

Griffin Artist Card membership is an initiative to increase access to our theatre. This program facilitates the coming together of artists across different disciplines and at different stages of their career. It supports and strengthens a vibrant emerging artist community, as well as acknowledging this community as an important part of the Griffin family and the wider theatre world.

How does it work? We want to offer a place where artists can see work, discuss work and make work.

To see work, we will continue to offer heavily discounted $15 tickets, which can be booked in the first fortnight of all Griffin and Griffin Independent shows, Performance Space shows at members' rates and ticket deals and giveaways to other theatre companies.

To discuss work, we are introducing regular Artist Card events where the community can come together for a drink.

And finally, we are supporting emerging artists in their making of new, bold and exciting work. Griffringe will continue to be a great avenue for artist card holders to display their work. We will also be offering (where possible!) free use of our space for readings and developments.

The Artist Card is a community. It is the glitter glue that brings all the cool amazing arty people together and helps them sparkle. So it's almost like glitter glue squared. If you are interested in joining the artist card outfit, please email artist@griffintheatre.com.au or come along to our next shindig….Hope to see you there!

Posts tagged Old Fitzroy Theatre

Nov 25
ARTIST OF THE WEEK: Q&A WITH TIM SPENCER
What are you working on at the moment?
I am performing in a production of Daniel Keene’s ‘The Share’ directed by Corey McMahon at the Reginald, Seymour Centre. It’s a really sharp script and its been a great challenge to take on.
What was the most inspiring thing you saw recently?
Dr. Brown’s Befrdfgth at the Old Fitz. He spent an hour and a bit listening to the audience and the result was a really special performance.
Best piece of advice you’ve ever been given?
This is a tie between ‘don’t be so busy with yourself’ and ‘people come to the theatre to see you, not your shitty ideas’. They’re kind of related actually, come to think of it. 
If you could have a meal with anybody, who would it be and why?
F. Scott Fitzgerald. He seems to know what he’s talking about.
THE SHARE
Tex and Sugar are best mates. They have lived together on the streets since they were kids. They are unemployed, broke and looking for trouble. A chance meeting with a one-eyed kid sets off a chain reaction of events that will change their lives forever…
A poetically brutal exploration of violence, masculinity and sexuality by award winning playwright Daniel Keene, produced by Peter Gahan in association with one of Adelaide’s most outstanding young companies. 
Performed with a live music score, prepare yourself for a funny, dark and fierce theatrical experience. 
The Share is part of the 2012 Reginald Season
21 November - 8 December
Times: Tue 6.30pm, Wed – Sat 8pm, Sat 8 Dec 2pm & 8pm
Duration: 55 mins (no interval)
Tickets: Preview/ Groups (8+) $22, Adult $30, Conc $27, Student Rush $15

ARTIST OF THE WEEK: Q&A WITH TIM SPENCER

What are you working on at the moment?

I am performing in a production of Daniel Keene’s ‘The Share’ directed by Corey McMahon at the Reginald, Seymour Centre. It’s a really sharp script and its been a great challenge to take on.

What was the most inspiring thing you saw recently?

Dr. Brown’s Befrdfgth at the Old Fitz. He spent an hour and a bit listening to the audience and the result was a really special performance.

Best piece of advice you’ve ever been given?

This is a tie between ‘don’t be so busy with yourself’ and ‘people come to the theatre to see you, not your shitty ideas’. They’re kind of related actually, come to think of it. 

If you could have a meal with anybody, who would it be and why?

F. Scott Fitzgerald. He seems to know what he’s talking about.

THE SHARE

Tex and Sugar are best mates. They have lived together on the streets since they were kids. They are unemployed, broke and looking for trouble. A chance meeting with a one-eyed kid sets off a chain reaction of events that will change their lives forever…

A poetically brutal exploration of violence, masculinity and sexuality by award winning playwright Daniel Keene, produced by Peter Gahan in association with one of Adelaide’s most outstanding young companies.

Performed with a live music score, prepare yourself for a funny, dark and fierce theatrical experience.

The Share is part of the 2012 Reginald Season

21 November - 8 December

Times: Tue 6.30pm, Wed – Sat 8pm, Sat 8 Dec 2pm & 8pm

Duration: 55 mins (no interval)

Tickets: Preview/ Groups (8+) $22, Adult $30, Conc $27, Student Rush $15


Oct 22
FALLOUT
I want to do it more. I like it. At first it was hard when she cried out but now I like it, that’s the best part I think. That’s the part that makes you feel good.’
In a sealed off room, strewn with broken toys and dress up clothes, the final frontier to freedom must be conquered. Alpha, Bravo, Charlie and Delta are four teenagers trapped within this world. With no intervention, they must create their own rules as they try to learn what pleases those who watch them. Violence, suffering and human connection become commodities to be traded as a desperation for release grows.
Director Kip Williams wrote a piece for Time Out about the production and working with playwright Maree Freeman:
"Maree Freeman and I first met whilst studying at NIDA. I was studying directing at the time, but had requested to sit in on some of the playwrights’ classes. I remember distinctly the first class I attended. There sat Maree talking about an idea for a play where the audience witnessed a violent ocean swirling beneath a glass living room floor. “Wow,” I thought, “this is a theatrical imagination I’d like to get to know better.”All of Maree’s plays possess this unique imaginative quality. They have the absurd logic of a Beckett, the aching brutality of a Kane, and a dark humour and light magic that are very specific to Maree.Fallout is no different. On a dirt-strewn floor, littered with old toys, and surrounded by endlessly high stone walls, four children must discover how to prove they are worthy of release to the unseen shadowy figures who watch them from above.Maree has a unique gift for capturing the liminal moment where a child teeters on the edge of adulthood. She does away with our contemporary compartmentalised thinking on this transition as being one of the stages of childhood, tweendom, teendom and young adulthood. Instead, she locates something more essential, presenting childhood and adulthood as two separate universes, and showing the shift between them as a single moment of initiation or loss of innocence.”
Read the rest of the piece here.
Jason Blake thought that
Freeman’s play benefits greatly from an imaginative and technically sharp production directed by Kip Williams, designed by Adrienn Lord, and lit by Nicholas Rayment. Actors Lizzie Schebesta, Michele Durman, Gabriel Fancourt and Amanda McGregor display similar levels of discipline and attention to detail in their performances. 
Not your typical good-night-out pub theatre experience, but recommended nonetheless.”

The Old Fitzroy TheatrePreview Dates: Oct 12th – Oct 14th 2012Season Dates: Oct 17th – Nov 3rd 2012Times: Tue-Sat 8pm, Sun 5pmTickets: $25 Conc, $33 Adult, Cheap Tuesdays and previews all $21Click HERE to buy tickets

FALLOUT

I want to do it more. I like it. At first it was hard when she cried out but now I like it, that’s the best part I think. That’s the part that makes you feel good.’

In a sealed off room, strewn with broken toys and dress up clothes, the final frontier to freedom must be conquered. Alpha, Bravo, Charlie and Delta are four teenagers trapped within this world. With no intervention, they must create their own rules as they try to learn what pleases those who watch them. Violence, suffering and human connection become commodities to be traded as a desperation for release grows.

Director Kip Williams wrote a piece for Time Out about the production and working with playwright Maree Freeman:

"Maree Freeman and I first met whilst studying at NIDA. I was studying directing at the time, but had requested to sit in on some of the playwrights’ classes. I remember distinctly the first class I attended. There sat Maree talking about an idea for a play where the audience witnessed a violent ocean swirling beneath a glass living room floor. “Wow,” I thought, “this is a theatrical imagination I’d like to get to know better.”

All of Maree’s plays possess this unique imaginative quality. They have the absurd logic of a Beckett, the aching brutality of a Kane, and a dark humour and light magic that are very specific to Maree.

Fallout is no different. On a dirt-strewn floor, littered with old toys, and surrounded by endlessly high stone walls, four children must discover how to prove they are worthy of release to the unseen shadowy figures who watch them from above.

Maree has a unique gift for capturing the liminal moment where a child teeters on the edge of adulthood. She does away with our contemporary compartmentalised thinking on this transition as being one of the stages of childhood, tweendom, teendom and young adulthood. Instead, she locates something more essential, presenting childhood and adulthood as two separate universes, and showing the shift between them as a single moment of initiation or loss of innocence.”

Read the rest of the piece here.

Jason Blake thought that

Freeman’s play benefits greatly from an imaginative and technically sharp production directed by Kip Williams, designed by Adrienn Lord, and lit by Nicholas Rayment. Actors Lizzie Schebesta, Michele Durman, Gabriel Fancourt and Amanda McGregor display similar levels of discipline and attention to detail in their performances.
Not your typical good-night-out pub theatre experience, but recommended nonetheless.”
The Old Fitzroy Theatre
Preview Dates:
Oct 12th – Oct 14th 2012
Season Dates: Oct 17th – Nov 3rd 2012
Times: Tue-Sat 8pm, Sun 5pm
Tickets: $25 Conc, $33 Adult, Cheap Tuesdays and previews all $21
Click HERE to buy tickets

Jul 29

Guest Blogger #10: Kate Gaul on ‘The Lunch Hour’

Earlier this year I produced and directed The New Electric Ballroom at the SBW Stables theatre as part of Griffin Independent.  It is a stunning play by Irishman Enda Walsh and we had an amazing season.  But there’s a play that I’ve been working on for some time and it’s a new Australian play by Chris Aronsten called The Lunch Hour  for a season at Darlinghurst Theatre from September 7th – October 7th, 2012.

I met Chris Aronsten – well, I estimate it was 1999.  We worked together in a theatre box office in Sydney.  All of the casual staff were pretty much writers, actors, directors or designers.  I was in and out of that kind of work as I established myself as a director in Sydney and kind of ended up following Chris around in various casual jobs. I main interest was directing new plays and I had already begun producing the occasional show.

Fast forward to 2006 – writers and directors tend to form relationships and Chris and I had kept in touch. He wrote a collection of three monologues titled Human Resources. I love the monologue form, I’d recently returned from a stint of professional development in America and I was really keen to get stuck into some new work.  What I love about Human Resources is it’s biting black comedy; the daring use of language (which requires actors working at the top of their game); and it’s themes of control and isolation.  It’s three monologues for two men and one woman.  They are thematically interlinked and when I directed the production for the Darlinghurst Theatre I also worked with an ensemble of actors - in addition to the three major characters - who acted like a Greek chorus assisting, observing, and (hopefully) heightening the action.

The characters and stories in Human Resources explore the dehumanising workplace that so many of us experience – the monologues also touch on fears of being replaced by machines, homophobia, violence and personal isolation. There is enormous compassion for these flawed, sometimes awful characters.

 What’s that quotation? “Most men lead lives of quiet desperation and go to the grave with the song still in them.” Henry David Thoreau.  Yes, that kind of sums up the world in this play.  You can take a look as some photos and reviews of Human Resources here.

So, keen to move onto a full length play Chris writes The Lunch Hour.  This is a play in two acts for seven actors. Wow!  A big ambitious move forward.

In the meantime Chris has written and directed Malice Toward None for the Old Fitz and been working on other projects.

When I first read The Lunch Hour I found it’s scarifying view of the world pretty confronting.  Six struggling artists in a call centre…. (mmm, they do say to write what you know …)  The office is like a jungle where the workers, like wild animals, compete to survive.  The Lunch Hour is also a comedy.  I guess it’s theme is human failure.  It’s also about dreams.  The play is outrageously theatrical and is about the theatre too. It’s definitely entertaining. It’s really funny and there’s nothing nicer than recoiling from an astute observation and gaffawing out loud. 

Like any great play it’s full of challenges for the director and actors.  It’s very fast moving with lots of one-line speeches and lots of cross talk – this is a busy office!  There’s a violence simmering under the surface, there is in fact a full-blown fight scene; the play moves through genres and - without giving anything away – there’s a big finish!

It’s an absolute ensemble piece and we have a wonderful cast – Angela Bauer, Briallen Clarke, Branden Christine, Shaun Rennie, Bali Padda, Sonny Vrebac and Gerry Sont.  And a terrific Creative team – Charli Dugdale, Luiz Pampolha, Daryl Wallis, Diego Retamales, Ash Bee and Kirby Burgess.  We’re fortunate and very grateful to be presenting this play at the Darlinghurst Theatre as part of the last season in the current theatre. Producing and presenting new Australian work is always risky and it’s heartening to have Darlinghurst’s support.

Ultimately I find The Lunch Hour to be very original.  I like the way if confronts me. I admire its skill and ambition.  And I am very excited to be starting rehearsal to bring  The Lunch Hour to a brave audience in Sydney.  I have not worked with any of the actors in the production so that’s also going to be a journey for us all.

In preparation for rehearsal we did get together with the cast for a couple of meetings in July.  Firstly the hear the play read be the cast. We’re having the playscript published to coincide with the season in September and that requires the play to be at the printer before rehearsals commence – scary!  Because as the play hasn’t been performed before there will be changes as we create the production.  It’s been useful to hear the play and already Chris has tweeked bits and pieces.  He’s also working with Daryl on some music for the show.  I like the way that once we are all in the room together ideas flow, suggestions are made and tried, mulled over and tried again.  It’s a harmonious relationship.  Chris will come into rehearsals occasionally.  With fresh eyes he can feedback on technical things like rhythm and tempo; focus any character or relationship slippages and be there to answer questions that may arise.  How wonderful to have the writer around.

We will have a weekly blog entry from one of the team.  Liz Arday who is our Assistant Director and Elizabeth Gibney who is observing the process will both be contributing. Currently there’s a bit of an interview with Chris on the site. And you can catch all of this here.

The adventure of the rehearsal room begins next Monday – wish us well!

 Kate Gaul  July, 2012


Jun 3

BRON BATTEN - SWEET CHILD OF MINE

I had the good fortune to catch the majesty of Bron Batten at Cut & Paste #12 last night at the Old Fitz. She stood on stage, telling us the story of her first kiss and ending it by becoming her sixteen year old self again, waiting for someone in the audience to come and kiss her as ‘So Kiss Me’ blasted over the speakers. It was electric.

Bron is a Melbourne-based artist and we are lucky enough to have her up here at the moment with her performance ofSweet Child of Mineat the Tiny Stadiums Festival at PACT. I’ll be catching up with her in the next couple of days to chat about her show but for now, here’s a sense of it from good ol’ Jason Blake:

Sweet Child of Mine, written and performed by Bron Batten, is also based on interviews, though sourced closer to home.

Training a video camera on her parents, Linda and Jim, Batten asks them to assess her artistic output to date. Their underwhelmed, bemused and skeptical responses to their daughter’s post-theatrical explorations (which have included a performance of a chicken abortion in an empty swimming pool and dressing up as a whale) are priceless. “What,” ponders Jim, “does all this have to do with the price of eggs?” Batten’s parents mightn’t know much about art, but they know what they like.
When Jim pops out from behind the curtain to regale the audience with stories and stale jokes while his daughter writhes through an abstract dance work on a paint-smeared floor, the effect is both excruciating and hilarious.
Charming, brave and sentimental, Sweet Child of Mine speaks winningly about art, love and respect.”

Showing at PACT.
8.30pm Wednesday to Saturday 6 – 9 June
Remember, show your Artist Card and receive concession price tickets.

May 28
ARTIST OF THE WEEK: Q&A WITH SHAELEE ROOKE
What are you working on currently? I’m in rehearsals for Factotum Theatre Company’s production of Chekhov’s Three Sisters. I play Irina, the youngest sister who longs for a fairy tale life in Moscow. Rehearsals have been going really well, but are quite exhausting as Irina goes through some pretty dramatic mood changes throughout the play! The production opens on the 7th June at the TAP Gallery and runs for three weeks.  After that, I’m off to the UK to do some more study. I’ll be doing a year long Masters program at the Bristol Old Vic Theatre School. I’m actually fundraising at the moment to help cover the exorbitant school fees. All donations are very much appreciated. Click here if you’d like to help out! What was the most interesting thing you saw recently? Well, the most interesting thing I’ve been to recently was the Homebrew Festival at the Old Fitzroy Hotel. This was a micro theatre and music festival that ran across three nights in the pub. The micro performances ran for about 10 minutes each and were really different from what you usually see - one took place in a toilet cubicle, one in a tent, one happened over skype. The night finished with a good ol’ thigh slapping hoedown with Fanny Lumsden and her Glorious Whores. The whole night was heaps of fun and a good mix of music and theatre. I’d love to see more of these sort of events around Sydney. What is the best piece of advice that you’ve been given? Everything always works out.  Who, past or present, would you like to share a meal with and why? It’d have to be fried chicken, black eyed peas and cornbread with Dolly Parton. Why? It’s Dolly Parton!
T.H.R.E.E. S.I.S.T.E.R.S. From Chekhov By Factotum Theatre
TAP Gallery June 7-23

ARTIST OF THE WEEK: Q&A WITH SHAELEE ROOKE

What are you working on currently?

I’m in rehearsals for Factotum Theatre Company’s production of Chekhov’s Three Sisters. I play Irina, the youngest sister who longs for a fairy tale life in Moscow. Rehearsals have been going really well, but are quite exhausting as Irina goes through some pretty dramatic mood changes throughout the play! The production opens on the 7th June at the TAP Gallery and runs for three weeks.

After that, I’m off to the UK to do some more study. I’ll be doing a year long Masters program at the Bristol Old Vic Theatre School. I’m actually fundraising at the moment to help cover the exorbitant school fees. All donations are very much appreciated. Click here if you’d like to help out!

What was the most interesting thing you saw recently?
Well, the most interesting thing I’ve been to recently was the Homebrew Festival at the Old Fitzroy Hotel. This was a micro theatre and music festival that ran across three nights in the pub. The micro performances ran for about 10 minutes each and were really different from what you usually see - one took place in a toilet cubicle, one in a tent, one happened over skype. The night finished with a good ol’ thigh slapping hoedown with Fanny Lumsden and her Glorious Whores. The whole night was heaps of fun and a good mix of music and theatre. I’d love to see more of these sort of events around Sydney.

What is the best piece of advice that you’ve been given?
Everything always works out.

Who, past or present, would you like to share a meal with and why?
It’d have to be fried chicken, black eyed peas and cornbread with Dolly Parton. Why? It’s Dolly Parton!

T.H.R.E.E. S.I.S.T.E.R.S.
From Chekhov
By Factotum Theatre

TAP Gallery
June 7-23


May 16

Day three: Of rehearsals, forests and a 5 am city.

Last night I came home.

I spent rehearsal with my sides hurting from laughing so hard- possibly not the professionalized way to direct, but I don’t direct anyway. I relax in the back of the boat enjoying the breeze and occasionally tap the rudder. Watching Scarlet up the contrast, clarify the intent, tiny one line tinkerings.


But when I am on a consistent 3/4 hours sleep all week, and my cast a flipping brilliant- I just sit back and enjoy. It makes it a much more inclusive muckabout- actors tossing about direction to each other, coming up with endings, and it means i get delightful surprises and a work improved by combined talents, joint ownership and casual lack of pressure. Its my preferred style, resulting in work not as tight as it could be with rigor real directing, but much faster, funner and often drunker. It is about us having a good time before giving the audience one. I love keeping it fresh and tripup-able and so finished the last of our two short rehearsals high n the talent of my wonderful creatures, all hanging back to smoke and run lines as I cycle off into the night for foresting.

I am excited for the show. Rough and ridiculous with some very good bits, sharp timing and great music to make up for the scripts failings. Hopefully.

And my forest: most of it went in today. I did not expect what I got: a strange fantasy land has taken over the pub- infinitely better that I thought I could be in my cold dawn rides home, where I was too tired to think and almost cult victim like with my blind trust in Alli of the week befores plans, my ability to do nothing but the many menial tasks set in front of me, a nirvana like un-thought that was quite tranquil over the irking sense something was terribly wrong.


Then it all looks so small loaded into the van of smiling joyful companions, and then I discover that the staple gun is truly the finest of gods creatures as I take to the Old Fitz’s crumbling walls with branches and flowers like a virus of forestry.


And she grows, and is Magic.

All done with beautiful helpers, drivers, amazing organizers. I am full of gratitude.
And contented exhaustion.
And magic.


Part One: On Writing A Play (as Alli Sebastian Wolf knows it)

On writing a play:

This play happened in two afternoons. And it happened without a name.

On Names:

I love names. Most of my projects start with a title, ‘The Hideous Dimise of Detective Slate’ started with it’s title and grew into a beast that lived in my life for years, and is yet still slumbering waiting to rise again. ‘The Importance of Being Earnest Dragons’ started as just that, and it’s extended version just on at the Fitz ‘The Importance Of Being Earnest Dragons And Other Classic Tales As Told By An Octopus’ started extending by just it’s title and my desire for a smoking jacket clad, pipe smoking octopus narrator. Even my first exhibition ‘Love Song For Pluto’ was just a name- and then with all of them I filled it out, growing something to drape the name on.

So when I had no name for the play about to be performed at Home Brew next week, it was a bit like not having a play at all. The working title (shudder the thought) was something like ‘play for home brew where a spaceship crashes in a jungle, d1’.

Now it is just The Jungle Play. Which was conceding to the naming gods.

But back to the writing. Keeping up? Still here? Gosh, aren’t you tolerant of rambles.

The Jungle Play:

So rather than a name this play started with a jungle. And a space ship I found on the side of the road. And me wanting to have a Siamese twin cannibalistic dandy lean over his piano and say ‘Don’t you know where you are? You’re in the Jungle, baby’ before busting out into Guns n Roses Welcome to The Jungle lounge singer style ala Richard Cheese.

And it started one wintery afternoon.

A pouring with rain wintery one a month or so back, just climbing out from under my last show which had been huge and sparkly and full of love and sexual tension, and the comedown had thrust a kind of immediacy on myself (and the beautiful Scarlet McGlynn who directed/produced), where my creative brain was interested only in drinking in the park with trashbag friends, and avoiding all thoughts of the life yapping to be caught up on.

This rainy afternoon broke that fog. While pretending to write my next play for Scarlet (Mermaid Teeth, hopefully to preview at the next Grifinge), I was listening to Mr Fibby, eating spaceship shaped gingerbread and overdosing on weak coffees, tapping pens, staring at the rain, reading the Bushwackers Songbook and generally procrastinating. I have been told this is an important part of the process, and certainly it is useful because like cooking and cleaning ones room, playwriting only gets done when you are meant to be doing something else or have people coming over. My Deep Sea Astronauts are my people coming over, I keep them close and keep us busy, thus enforcing writing, staking out time to keep talented people playing creative talents. More of them in ‘Part Two: Rehearsals’.

And ‘Mermaid Teeth’ was a thing that needed to get done.

So naturally I avoided it by starting what is now The Jungle Play. And I was suddenly writing these characters, strange new creatures that started nattering away in my head and jostling for attention on the keys. These wonderful new voices, new personalities and I had no warning as to the mischief that were up to - it was making me laugh hard enough to distract the nearby tables. That is serious Reason Number One why I do playwriting, it is the first treat of making theatre – the hilarious delightful surprises.

And then they got tired and fell asleep and spent the next weeks glaring at me from the wardrobe demanding to know what was going to happen to them and why did I own this many scratchy jumpers?

But they would not finish the play, and I had a forest to build to infest the upper floor of the Fitz for the festival, and friends to play with and a band to pretend to be in, so I chucked them a blanket I left them there til they decided to write their own bloody play.

This week I had something else due, quick writings on given modern urban characters for Write Here Write Now- an Augusta Supple brain child of getting playwrights together. It was not a soul project for me, and after breaking the rules so the moon could be a character I got bored and wandered over to see what my Home Brew characters were doing. Still a stalemate from Marko and the King Of France, and Spaceman Blake never really had much to say. But then some valley girl rock witches walked in and started stomping all over the place, demanding the attention and threatening to eat people. It was brilliant and I loved them for it. So another afternoon and there is a play.

Almost.

I have clearly stopped writing the play before the play has stopped.

But that is the joy of rehearsals. First one on the morrow. Very exciting – that is the next a biggest treat of playwriting – the what happens when the words are not in your head but taking shapes in the bodies of others.

Til then – thank you for trying to read this. See you in the forest.


May 15
In Which Alli Sebastian Wolf Tries To Do A Blog
Prologue: A Forest
Part One: Writing A Play
Part Two: Rehearsals
Part Three: The Jungle Play at Home Brew Festival
Epilogue: Thoughts, Astronauts and Other Things Because I’m Meant To Do This For A Few Weeks.

A Forest:
Hello Blog Readers.
There is this thing, a miniature festival shaped thing, called Home Brew. It will be at my favorite of all theatre type places The Old Fitzroy on Thursday Friday and Saturday next week, and it will be amazing – all music and intimate strange performances. http://rocksurfers.org/2012/03/home-brew-festival/
And part will take place in a forest. I am living on very little sleep in the hope of making that forest, because Phil Spencer said ‘Alli, I have a fantasy that all of this level of the pub is a forest’ and what girl can say no to an impossible task like three weeks, no budget, make me a forest?
So: Little sleep, Cherry Ripes and podcasts of American Public Radio.
I am no good when offered impossible tasks – like be guest blogger during your busiest week of the winter while you try to make a whole forest and create a puppet show /play about a crushed spaceman) – Impossible task are just so tasty. It’s tornado chasing for artist. It’s jumping off the cliff without looking to see what’s beneath you. It’s the only way to fly.

In Which Alli Sebastian Wolf Tries To Do A Blog

Prologue: A Forest

Part One: Writing A Play

Part Two: Rehearsals

Part Three: The Jungle Play at Home Brew Festival

Epilogue: Thoughts, Astronauts and Other Things Because I’m Meant To Do This For A Few Weeks.

A Forest:

Hello Blog Readers.

There is this thing, a miniature festival shaped thing, called Home Brew. It will be at my favorite of all theatre type places The Old Fitzroy on Thursday Friday and Saturday next week, and it will be amazing – all music and intimate strange performances. http://rocksurfers.org/2012/03/home-brew-festival/

And part will take place in a forest. I am living on very little sleep in the hope of making that forest, because Phil Spencer said ‘Alli, I have a fantasy that all of this level of the pub is a forest’ and what girl can say no to an impossible task like three weeks, no budget, make me a forest?

So: Little sleep, Cherry Ripes and podcasts of American Public Radio.

I am no good when offered impossible tasks – like be guest blogger during your busiest week of the winter while you try to make a whole forest and create a puppet show /play about a crushed spaceman) – Impossible task are just so tasty. It’s tornado chasing for artist. It’s jumping off the cliff without looking to see what’s beneath you. It’s the only way to fly.


May 14
HOME BREW FESTIVAL
Home Brew is back! For three nights only the legendary Old Fitzroy Theatre & Hotel runs riot with this home-made and grass roots festival. Sponsored by Little Creatures Brewing Company and presented by Tamarama Rock Surfers - Home Brew packs every nook and cranny of the Theatre & Hotel with live music, micro-performances, a forest and a pop-up kitchen from Bistro Bistro. They’ll be music in the intimate 60 seat theatre and there will be micro-performances unfolding in toilet cubicles, dilapidated bath tubs, via Skype and on Woolloomooloo’s finest balcony bar. Home Brew is for punters who like their music sleazy, their theatre up close and personal and their Pale Ale ice cold. Home Brew Festival Line Up: Music: Fanny Lumsden & Caitlin Park Micro-Performances: Tim Spencer, Tin Shed, Jimmy Dalton (via Skype), You Move Dance Company (Kay Armstrong, Carl Sciberras), Mel Matheson, Zoe Norton-Lodge, Bruce Glen (The Gentleman Magician) Michelle Pastor & The Deep Sea Astronauts. Festival Directors: Phil Spencer & Lars Oscar Hedstrom Venue: The Old Fitzroy Theatre Dates: May 17th – 19th 2012 Times: 7pm doors. Tickets: $35/$30  Bookings: www.rocksurfers.org or 1300 241 167
I have asked Alli Sebastian Wolf to do some blogging for us this week about her involvement in Home Brew and how she likes to shake her arty tail-feather.

HOME BREW FESTIVAL

Home Brew is back! For three nights only the legendary Old Fitzroy Theatre & Hotel runs riot with this home-made and grass roots festival.

Sponsored by Little Creatures Brewing Company and presented by Tamarama Rock Surfers - Home Brew packs every nook and cranny of the Theatre & Hotel with live music, micro-performances, a forest and a pop-up kitchen from Bistro Bistro.

They’ll be music in the intimate 60 seat theatre and there will be micro-performances unfolding in toilet cubicles, dilapidated bath tubs, via Skype and on Woolloomooloo’s finest balcony bar.

Home Brew is for punters who like their music sleazy, their theatre up close and personal and their Pale Ale ice cold.

Home Brew Festival Line Up:

Music: Fanny Lumsden & Caitlin Park

Micro-Performances: Tim Spencer, Tin Shed, Jimmy Dalton (via Skype), You Move Dance Company (Kay Armstrong, Carl Sciberras), Mel Matheson, Zoe Norton-Lodge, Bruce Glen (The Gentleman Magician) Michelle Pastor & The Deep Sea Astronauts.

Festival Directors: Phil Spencer &
Lars Oscar Hedstrom

Venue: The Old Fitzroy Theatre
Dates: May 17th – 19th 2012
Times: 7pm doors.
Tickets: $35/$30 
Bookings: www.rocksurfers.org or 1300 241 167

I have asked Alli Sebastian Wolf to do some blogging for us this week about her involvement in Home Brew and how she likes to shake her arty tail-feather.


Apr 22
Tamarama Rock Surfers - 2012 Season Announced
Just a quick note that TRS have announced their line-up for the coming year. All I can say is, in the vein of Pauline Hanson, ‘I’m excited’.
Check out the season here.

Tamarama Rock Surfers - 2012 Season Announced

Just a quick note that TRS have announced their line-up for the coming year. All I can say is, in the vein of Pauline Hanson, ‘I’m excited’.

Check out the season here.


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